Wages for Facebook

waht-you-think
In January 2014, the website “Wages for Facebook” was launched. The single-page maximalist manifesto slowly scrolls by in large blocky caps, beginning with the declaration that:

“THEY SAY IT’S FRIENDSHIP. WE SAY IT’S UNWAGED WORK. WITH EVERY LIKE, CHAT, TAG OR POKE OUR SUBJECTIVITY TURNS THEM A PROFIT. THEY CALL IT SHARING. WE CALL IT STEALING…”

The text is a rewriting of key passages from “Wages Against Housework,” a pamphlet central to a feminist campaign in the 1970s condemning the unpaid labor of housework and caregiving. The theoretical import of the 1970s campaign was huge at its time – “Wages Against Housework” challenged certain historical materialisms that relegated power and social reproduction to a superstructural level altogether separate from the material base of production. Extending the “social factory” approach to value production, this materialist feminism demonstrated why the cultural, corporeal, and subjective dimensions of social reproduction are just as fundamental to the material structure of capitalism as economics. Continue reading “Wages for Facebook”

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State Chart (chapter 3)

  Pole 1 Pole 2
Mythic Figure Magician-King Jurist-Priest
Operation Conquest Contract
(method) (bond) (pact)
Medieval Technique Discipline Confession
(substance / operation) (body / force) (self / reflection)
Modern Organ Police Publicity
(means / effect) (order / splendor & happiness) (reason / right & will)
Science Policy Public
(scientific task / connaissance) (prevention / statistics) (legitimacy / consensus)
Discipline Political Economy Public Opinion
(method) (axiomatics) (deliberation)
Mid-Century Political Form State Socialism Liberal Capitalism
Biopower The Spectacle